Background

Passed by Congress in July, 2016 and signed into law by President Obama in the same month, the Denying Americans the Right to Know (DARK) Act struck down a Vermont law requiring easy, clear to read GMO labeling on food packaging. The new law also preempted labeling laws in Connecticut, Maine, Alaska and seed labeling laws in Vermont and Virginia while also preventing other states from adopting similar legislation in the future.

CFSA opposed this legislation and other versions of it for years. This new law will require food manufacturers to disclose genetically modified ingredients, but will allow them to do so using printed labels, QR codes, or, in some cases, by printing toll-free numbers consumers can call to ask if the product they’re about to purchase contains GMOs. The bill also raised questions at the US Food and Drug Administration about whether certain types of genetically engineered food would be labeled at all.

CFSA remains committed to transparency in the food system, and will work along with our members to influence the rule making process. If you are interested in receiving emails from CFSA letting you know about opportunities for public comment, please sign up for our Action Alerts at bit.ly/axnalerts.

(Want to skip the background info? Skip straight to Updates    or     Take Action)

The battle over labeling foods that contain genetically modified organisms (GMOs) continues. There is broad consumer demand for labeling these products, but federal law will stop states from enforcing laws that require labeling of GMO ingredients. Instead, Congress established a national standard for GMO labeling that continues to leave consumers in the dark about what is in their food.

A poll shows that 93% of consumers want to know if their food contains GMOs, and our certified organic farmer members here at CFSA agree. CFSA has long opposed any bill calling for anything less than mandatory labeling of genetically engineered ingredients. Anything less keep consumers in the dark about information they want to have, and have negative impacts on the farmers who work hard every day to grow and raise food that is good to eat, better  for farmers and farm workers, and good for the environment


Updates

July 15, 2016 

Senate Bill 763 is on its way to President Obama’s desk after a 306-117 vote on the bill in the House of Representatives yesterday. It is expected that the President will sign the bill into law. The New York Times published an interesting and informative take on the new law. Check it out here.

July 14, 2016

The House Rules Committee voted to allow no new amendments to Senate Bill 763. The full House is expected to vote TODAY on the bill. Please take action TODAY.

July 11, 2016

The House Rules Committee will meet Tuesday afternoon to approve a rule for debating Senate Bill 763. House Rules may not allow any amendments to be debated on the floor. The full House is expected to vote on the bill later this week. 

July 9, 2016

The Senate voted yesterday 63-30 to pass Senate Bill 763. Last minute compromises were done behind closed doors by Senate Agriculture Committee Chair and Ranking Member Pat Roberts (R-KS) and Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) in consultation with industry groups. While amendments to the measure were filed, the Senate was largely operating under a procedure in which there was no room for modifications, and thus none were offered or voted on.

June 28, 2016

A modified version of Senate Bill 764 was just revealed. The revised legislation would mandate federal GMO labeling that will preempt state-level laws like those in Vermont, Maine and Connecticut, replacing them with a weaker labeling standard that will leave consumers without the information they overwhelmingly want.

Senate Bill 764 is up for a vote on the Senate floor on July 6, 2016. Although touted as a compromise, this bill would allow food manufacturers to meet labeling requirements using QR codes and toll free phone numbers. The bill also uses a limited definition of “genetic engineering” (GE) that  doesn’t include newer forms of GE technology, meaning that many GMO foods will not be subject to the labeling requirements. Call your Senators today to urge them to oppose Senate Bill 764.

Please take action TODAY against this harmful bill.

March 16, 2016

The DARK Act has stalled in the Senate! This morning, the Senate voted 49 ‘yes’ to 48 ‘no’ to invoke cloture on Senate Bill 764, the latest Senate version of the DARK Act. 60 ‘yes’ votes were needed to pass the cloture motion and move the bill forward, which would have allowed for full debate on the bill and a final vote. Some Senators broke party rank with three Democrats voting for cloture and six Republicans voting against. All four Senators from the Carolinas voted ‘yes’ to move the bill forward.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell (R-KY) voted against cloture, which allows him to bring up the legislation up again later if members draft a compromise that more Senators will support. Senators Jeff Merkeley (D-OR) and Debbie Stabenow (D-MI) stood firm in their opposition to the bill and spoke at length on the Senate floor about the high consumer demand for GMO labeling on products.

Senator McConnell’s vote against cloture wasn’t just wishful thinking; Senators could still reach a compromise that melds parts of this Republican-backed bill and another recent GMO labeling bill put forward by Senate Democrats, which seeks to make GMO labeling mandatory and offers food manufacturers several options for including GMO information on or near the ingredients list.

CFSA will continue to track this legislation and keep you informed if there is any movement towards new Senate legislation around GMO labeling.

March 15, 2016

Senate bill 764 makes some substantial changes to the House version of the DARK Act and will be up for a vote as early as TOMORROW – March 16. CFSA vehemently opposes Senate Bill 764. It creates a sham labeling scheme that will hurt organic and certified non-GMO food producers by prohibiting them from even implying that their products are safe or healthy.

What does this bad bill do? It creates a voluntary, GMO labeling scheme. The bill gives USDA authority to decide how foods will be labeled, but indicates that this will be done with scannable QR codes. This don’t offer consumers an easy or accessible way to find out if their food contains GMOs (who has time to scan every single food item you want to buy at a grocery store?).

If at least 70% of food manufacturers aren’t voluntarily labeling GMO products within a couple of years, USDA must require food manufacturers to start labeling. But get this: USDA can decide that “labeling” is accomplished by setting up consumer call centers, or a website. In other words, if most companies aren’t using the voluntary standard in 2 years, you may have to go online or call somebody to find out if your food contains GMOs. If you thought you didn’t have time to scan individual QR codes…well, just wait. That’s what food manufacturers might be doing!

But wait, there’s more! This bill will block current and any future state GMO labeling laws. That’s why this bill is moving fast.  This July, Vermont is set to become the first of several states to begin enforcing laws requiring labeling of GMO products.

And the poison pill: this bill prohibits any claims about the safety or quality of foods that don’t contain GMOs. We are concerned about the impact this could have on pre-existing claims that already tell consumer their food is GMO-free.

Please take action TODAY against this harmful bill.

March 4, 2016

Passing the Senate’s version of the DARK Act got more complicated. Four Senate Democrats introduced the Biotechnology Food Labeling and Uniformity Act two days ago. Senators Jeff Merkley (D-OR), Patrick Leahy (D-VT), Jon Tester (D-MT) and Dianne Feinstein (D-CA) proposed the bill as an alternative to the DARK Act.that requires mandatory labeling of all foods that contain genetically modified ingredients (GMOs). The bill offers food manufacturers four ways to let consumers know what’s in their food:

  1. Including the words “genetically engineered” in parentheses after an ingredient on the Nutrition Facts panel;
  2. identifying all genetically modified ingredients with an asterisk (*) on the Nutrition Facts panel, with an explanation at the bottom;
  3. putting language below the ingredient list on the Nutrition Facts panel that tells the product is produced with genetically engineered ingredients; or
  4. providing FDA the authority to work with food manufacturers to develop a symbol that would be used on packaging, that would clearly disclose the presence of GMO ingredients.

According to the sponsors, the bill is intended to increase transparency about GMO ingredients for consumers, while providing a uniform labeling standard for businesses. The bill is unlikely to pass, but its existence may make it harder for Democrats to support the Republican bill, which calls for voluntary labeling of GMOs.

Read the bill here: Biotechnology Food Labeling Uniformity Act.

March 1, 2016

The Senate Agricultural Committee voted 14-6 today to pass their version of the DARK Act. The bill will now move to the Senate floor for a full debate and vote. No date has been set but we will send out an Action Alert once it has been scheduled with information on how to contact your Senators. Sign up for our Action Alerts here.

Here is a list of how the members of the Committee voted:

Yes
Pat Roberts (R – Kansas)
Thad Cochran (R – Mississippi)
Mitch McConnell (R – Kentucky)
John Boozman (R – Arkansas)
John Hoeven (R – North Dakota)
David Purdue (R – Georgia)
Joni Ernst (R – Iowa)
Thom Tillis (R – North Carolina)
Ben Sasse (R – Nebraska)
Charles Grassley (R – Iowa)
John Thune (R – South Dakota)
Joe Donnelly (D – Indiana)
Heidi Heitkamp (D-North Dakota)
Amy Klobuchar (D – Minnesota).

No
Debbie Stabenow (D – Michigan)
Patrick Leahey (D – Vermont)
Sherrod Brown (D – Ohio)
Michael Bennet (D – Colorado)
Kristen Gillibrand (D – New York)
Robert Casey, Jr. (D – Pennsylvania)  

February 29, 2016

The Senate will mark-up its version of the DARK Act TOMORROW, MARCH 1 at 10AM, The bill, introduced by Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (R-Kan) is titled the “National Voluntary Bioengineered Food Labeling Standard”. The quick turnaround on this bill is no coincidence. This July, Vermont is set to become the first state to pass a law requiring labeling on GMO products. This bill is a desperate attempt to block Vermont’s, and other states’, efforts from telling consumers the truth about what’s in their food.

Please see the Action Alert below.

February 24, 2016

The Senate Agriculture Committee has postponed its planned Thursday markup of Chairman Roberts’s (R-Kan) anti-GMO labeling bill until next week due to “changes on the Senate floor.” We hear that negotiations on a deal are still ongoing, which may have affected the postponement. A new markup date has not been announced. We’ll share more info as we have it.

February 23, 2016

A bill similar to the “Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act” has been introduced in the Senate for mark-up on February 24th at 10AM, by Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (R-Kan). The draft bill is titled the “National Voluntary Bioengineered Food Labeling Standard”. The quick turnaround on this bill is no coincidence. This July, Vermont is set to become the first state to pass a law requiring labeling on GMO products. This bill is a desperate attempt to block Vermont’s, and other states’, efforts from telling consumers the truth about what’s in their food.

December 20, 2015

Thanks to pressure from advocates across the country, the omnibus budget deal passed by the US Congress did not include a policy rider that would have blocked states from implementing mandatory GMO food labeling laws. According to news reports, Senators Blumenthal (D-CT), Markey (D-MA), Sanders (D-VT), Leahy (D-VT), Reed (D-RI), Heinrich (D-NM), Warren (D-MA), Tester (D-MT), Merkley (D-OR), Boxer (D-CA) and Booker (D-NJ) led a Dear Colleague letter opposing the rider. Senate Appropriations Committee Vice Chairwoman Mikulski (D-MD) also worked to keep the rider out.

Senator Debbie Stabenow (D-MI), ranking member of the Senate Agriculture Committee, and Senator John Hoeven (R-ND) have both hinted at potential Senate bills addressing GMO labeling, but no legislation has been introduced at this date.

December 9, 2015

This past summer, H.R. 1599, also known as “The DARK Act” was passed by the U.S. House with a vote of 275-150. The proceeding months were filled with rumors of a Senate version of the bill, but one was never brought forward for a vote. Despite being outspent by the Grocery Manufacturers Association and the biotech industry by an estimated $150 million, pro-GMO labeling efforts managed to prevent this harmful anti-GMO labeling legislation from passing as a stand-alone bill in 2015: a victory for the GMO labeling movement.

But the battle in 2015 is not over yet.

Congress faces an important budget deadline at midnight on Friday, December 11. And now the anti-GMO labeling lobby is attempting to hijack the federal government’s budget deal to further their own interests.

Friday, Dec. 11 is the expiration date for the Continuing Resolution that was passed in September to keep funding the federal government. Since September, Congress has been negotiating an omnibus appropriations bill to fund the government through the end of Fiscal Year 2016. An omnibus bill pulls together many appropriations bills together into one big package. If the budget is not passed by Friday at midnight, the federal government will shut down.

Bill add-ons – known as “riders” – are often attached to large bill packages like this upcoming omnibus. A rider is a provision added to a bill that typically has little connection with the actual subject matter of the bill. Riders are usually used as a tactic to pass a controversial provision that would not pass as its own bill. And the 2016 omnibus budget bill is no exception.

The Grocery Manufacturers Association and the biotech industry are currently lobbying Congress and the White House for a rider provision to this omnibus budget that would call for a two-year temporary federal preemption on GMO labeling requirements. This means that if the rider is included in the budget, states wouldn’t be able to enforce GMO labeling requirements, even if they had laws on the books requiring labeling. Specifically, Vermont, poised to begin enforcement of its GMO labeling law in 2016, would be prohibited from enforcing its law.

Washington insiders predict that a temporary rider would set the stage for Congress to pass a permanent federal preemption of state GMO labeling laws in 2016.

While this rider is different than “The DARK Act,” if included in the budget, it would essentially have the same effects on GMO labeling across the country: it would prevent states from passing GMO labeling requirements and it would prevent Vermont from enforcing its new labeling law.

CFSA believes that people have the right to know what is in their food and that using a federal budget bill to stop states from labeling GMOs is a dirty tactic.

October 2, 2015

The Senate is expected to begin work on their version of the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act this month. This is part of the continued effort on the part of the biotech and the grocery store industries to stop efforts to label GMO products. The bill will be sponsored by Sen. John Hoeven (R-ND). There are no Democratic co-sponsors. The Senate Agriculture Committee is expected to hear the bill soon with the goal of introducing the bill to the full Senate in November.


August 20, 2015

The New England Journal of Medicine published an article today titled “GMOs, Herbicides, and Public Health.” The article highlights new concerns with possible carcinogen risk from glyphosate and the authors call for delayed implementation of the EPA’s recent decision on Enlist Duo. The authors also state that it is time for the U.S. to take a new look at GMO labeling laws because they are essential to tracking food and for consumer choice.

July 23, 2014

Today, the House passed H.R. 1599 – the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act – with a vote of 275-150. Votes from NC and SC representatives are listed below. We will update our members if and when the Senate begins consideration of this, or a similar, bill. Media reports state that the bill’s sponsor, Representative Mike Pompeo (R-KS), and Senate Agriculture Committee Chairman Pat Roberts (R-KS) are in talks about getting a companion bill through the Senate; work is expected to begin in earnest this fall.

North Carolina

Aye

 D

Butterfield, G.K.

NC 1st

Aye

 R

Ellmers, Renee

NC 2nd

Aye

 R

Jones, Walter

NC 3rd

No

 D

Price, David

NC 4th

Aye

 R

Foxx, Virginia

NC 5th

Aye

 R

Walker, Mark

NC 6th

Aye

 R

Rouzer, David

NC 7th

Aye

 R

Hudson, Richard

NC 8th

Aye

 R

Pittenger, Robert

NC 9th

Aye

 R

McHenry, Patrick

NC 10th

Aye

 R

Meadows, Mark

NC 11th

Aye

 D

Adams, Alma

NC 12th

Aye

 R

Holding, George

NC 13th

 

South Carolina

No

 R

Sanford, Mark

SC 1st

Aye

 R

Wilson, Joe

SC 2nd

Aye

 R

Duncan, Jeff

SC 3rd

Aye

 R

Gowdy, Trey

SC 4th

Aye

 R

Mulvaney, Mick

SC 5th

Aye

 D

Clyburn, Jim

SC 6th

Aye

 R

Rice, Tom

SC 7th

July 14, 2014

This morning, the House Agriculture Committee approved the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act of 2015. The bill is likely to head to the House floor for a vote during the week July 20, 2014.

June 2015

According to media reports, the lead sponsor of the bill, Rep. Mike Pompeo (R-KS), believes that he has the votes needed for full approval of the bill by the House of Representatives before the August recess (August 4 – September 5). Unfortunately, support for the bill has been building and there are now 5 co-sponsors on this bill from NC: Rep. G.K. Butterfield (D-1), Rep. Renee Ellmers (R-2), Rep. Walter Jones, Jr. (R-3), Rep. Alma Adams (D-12) and Rep. George Holding (R-13), and one co-sponsor from SC: Rep. Mick Mulvaney (R-5). Before the bill can be heard on the floor of the House, however, the bill will need to go for a markup in the House Energy and Commerce Committee and then the House Agriculture Committee, which both share jurisdiction over the measure. Currently there is no date set for the Energy and Commerce session.

The legislation currently has 65 total co-sponsors, which includes 12 Democrats.

May 2015

The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act was introduced in the US Congress in early

Ben&Jerry2015. This bill will make it more difficult for consumers to know what is in their food. Unfortunately, the bill is co-sponsored by two Representatives from North Carolina – Congressman G.K. Butterfield (D-1) and Congresswoman Alma Adams (D-12). The bill has not yet started to move through Congress, but a recent federal court ruling in Vermont forecasts a win for state-level labeling laws; this makes it more likely that Congress will intervene to create a federal labeling (or anti-labeling) law.

Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are found in almost all processed foods and this act would eliminate state laws that require these products be labeled for consumers who want to avoid them. This bill would make it so difficult for consumers to understand what is in their food that opponents call it the DARK Act (Deny Americans the Right to Know Act).

The bill seeks to:

  • Override current and any future state laws that require labeling of foods with genetically modified ingredients;

  • Replace state-level labeling laws with two voluntarily labeling regimes that will unfairly burden farmers and food companies that provide the products consumers prefer; and

  • Require the FDA to provide a “natural” certification that will undermine the USDA Organic certification that many farmers and food companies rely on to distinguish their product in a competitive and confusing marketplace.

Proponents of the bill, many of which are lobbyists for the biotech and industry, claim that GMO labeling would significantly raise the annual cost of food for Americans. However, both research and practice have debunked this concern (see Action Alert links below).

CFSA opposes this harmful bill. If passed, the bill will only further confuse consumers and negatively impact the USDA Certified Organic brand, thus harming organic family farms across the Carolinas and the nation.

Take Action

July 18, 2016

Take a look at the law. Read this article by the New York Times. And sign up for CFSA’s Action Alerts so that you’ll be sure to hear from us when the time comes to submit comments to USDA about implementation of the new law.

July 14, 2016

Take Action Now!
Please call or email your Representative TODAY!

Click here to find the contact information for your Representative.

When you call or email, you may use this outline (or use your own language!):

“Hello, my name is ______________________ and I am a constituent of the Congressperson (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming). I am contacting the Representative because I oppose the Senate Bill 764 and I urge him/her VOTE NO today against the bill. 

I support GMO labeling that is transparent and easy for consumers to understand. This bill does not accomplish those goals. Digital forms of labeling (like QR codes) aren’t transparent or easy to understand. I also oppose the definition of genetic engineering in the bill; it is too narrow and will keep consumers from getting the information they want about their food.

Over 90% of consumers want to know if their food contains GMOs. I should be able to eat what I want; I can only do that if labeling laws give me the information I need to make informed decisions.  For these reasons, I ask you to VOTE NO on Senate Bill 764. Thank you.

July 11, 2016

Take Action Now!
Please call or email your Representative TODAY!

Click here to find the contact information for your Representative.

When you call or email, you may use this outline (or use your own language!):

“Hello, my name is ______________________ and I am a constituent of the Congressperson (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming). I am contacting the Representative because I oppose the Senate Bill 764 and I urge him/her to oppose it, too.

I support GMO labeling that is transparent and easy for consumers to understand. This bill does not accomplish those goals. Digital forms of labeling (like QR codes) aren’t transparent or easy to understand. I also oppose the definition of genetic engineering in the bill; it is too narrow and will keep consumers from getting the information they want about their food.

Over 90% of consumers want to know if their food contains GMOs. I should be able to eat what I want; I can only do that if labeling laws give me the information I need to make informed decisions.  For these reasons, I ask you to oppose any effort to move forward with Senate Bill 764. Thank you.”

June 28, 2016

Take Action Now!
Please call or email your Senator TODAY!

Here are links to the contact websites for the Carolinas’ Senators:

North Carolina                South Carolina
Richard Burr                   Tim Scott
Thom Tillis                      Lindsey Graham

When you call or email, you may use this outline (or use your own language!):
“Hello, my name is ______________________ and I am a constituent of the Senator (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming). I am contacting the Senator because I oppose the Senate Bill 764 and I urge him to oppose it, too.

I support GMO labeling that is transparent and easy for consumers to understand. This bill does not accomplish those goals.Digital forms of labeling (like QR codes) aren’t transparent or easy to understand. I also oppose the definition of genetic engineering in the bill; it is too narrow and will keep consumers from getting the information they want about their food.

Over 90% of consumers want to know if their food contains GMOs. I should be able to eat what I want; I can only do that if labeling laws give me the information I need to make informed decisions.  For these reasons, I ask you to oppose any effort to move forward with Senate Bill 764. Thank you.”

February 29, 2016

Please join us in calling or emailing NC Senator Thom Tillis, who sits on the Senate Agriculture Committee and has a say in whether the bill gets passed along for a full vote by the Senate. Please email or call Senator Tillis TODAY and tell him that you oppose the “National Voluntary Bioengineered Food Labeling Standard.”

Senator Tillis
Email
Phone: (202) 224-6342

When you email or, you may use this script (or use your own language!):

Hello, my name is ______________________ and I am a constituent of Senator Tillis (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming). I am emailing because I oppose the “National Voluntary Bioengineered Food Labeling Standard,”which is scheduled for mark-up by the Senate Agriculture Committee on Wednesday, February 24, 2016. I oppose any legislation that tries to restrict the labeling of  products with GMO ingredients.

GMOs are associated with herbicide Roundup that has been found by the World Health Organization to be carcinogenic. This bill would result in increased use of GMOs and herbicide application that would further threaten our environment and health. We need to further study the full effects of these products on our bodies and our ecosystems.

We have the right to know what is in our food; polls show that over 90% of consumers want to know if their food contains GMOs. I should have the right to choose if this is a product that I want to purchase. 

For these reasons, I ask you to oppose the “National Voluntary Bioengineered Food Labeling Standard” or any other bill that restricts labeling GMO food.

December 9, 2015

The White House and your U.S. Senators need to hear from you TODAY!

Email the White House, or call and leave a comment at 202-456-1111.

Email or call your Senators:

North Carolina
Richard Burr 202-224-3154
Thom Tillis 202-224-3154

South Carolina
Tim Scott 202-224-6121
Lindsey Graham  202-224-5972

When you call or email, you may use this outline (or use your own language!):

Hello, my name is ________________ and I live in [North/South] Carolina (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming). I want the [President/Senator] to oppose any policy rider in the omnibus government spending bill that will stop states from enforcing GMO labeling laws. About 90% of Americans are strongly in favor of GMO labeling. Americans want a strong, mandatory, GMO labeling law. Any effort to stop states from labeling GMOs using a federal budget bill is disrespectful to Americans who want to know what they are feeding their families.

 

August 31, 2015

Please email your U.S. Representative and both of your U.S. Senators and tell them that you oppose the “Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act”!

A simple email to your U.S. Congresspeople will help them to understand that their constituents wish to have the right to know what is in their food. Please email your Representative and both of your Senators.

Click here if you do not know your who your Representative is, or need his/her contact information.

Here are links to the contact websites for the Carolinas’ Senators:

North Carolina
Richard Burr
Thom Tillis

South Carolina
Tim Scott
Lindsey Graham

When you email, you may use this outline (or use your own language!):

Hello, my name is ______________________ and I am a constituent of the [Senator/Representative ] (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming). I am emailing because I oppose H.R. 1599 “The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act”, which was passed by the House earlier this year. I also oppose any Senate bill that tries to restrict labeling of  products with GMO ingredients or places the burden of labeling on non-GMO foods.

A recent Perspectives Article published by the prestigious New England Journal of Medicine calls into question the safety of the herbicides sprayed on crops engineered to withstand these chemicals. The vast majority of GMO crops grown in the U.S. are modified to withstand herbicides. Use of these crops has already led to sharp increases in the amount of chemical herbicides used in the U.S. With the development of new crops designed to withstand spraying from more powerful herbicides there will be additional increases in herbicide use in the next few years. The World Health Organization recently found evidence that the most commonly used herbicide, glyphosate, is a “probable human carcinogen.” And the authors of the piece in the New England Journal of Medicine point out that studies conducted on the safety of these herbicides are outdated and flawed.

It’s not just science; consumers want to know when their food is genetically modified. The vast majority of the American public, in poll after poll, want to see foods with genetically modified ingredients labeled. Every survey for years shows consumer support for labeling to be at or above 90%.

As a consumer I should have the right to know if my food has been genetically altered in a manner that introduces probable carcinogens into the food chain. I should have the right to choose if this is a product that I want to purchase. We also need to further study the full effects of these products on our bodies and our ecosystems.

For these reasons, I ask you to oppose “The Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act” or any other bill that restricts labeling GMO food or puts the burden for labeling on non-GMO foods.

Thank you,
_______________


July 23 2015

Please make a phone call TODAY and ask your representative
to VOTE NO on H.R. 1599, the “Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act”!

A simple email, phone call, or tweet to your Congressperson will help them to understand that their constituents wish to have the right to know what is in their food.

Click here if you do not know who represents you in Congress.

When you call or email, you may use this outline:

  1. Introduce yourself (first and last name) and explain that you are a constituent of the Congressperson (if you are a farmer, be sure to mention that you are actively involved in farming).

  2. Say that you are calling or emailing because you oppose H.R. 1599 the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act and you hope that your Congressperson will vote against the bill.

  3. Say that you do not support H.R. 1599 the Safe and Accurate Food Labeling Act because (use one or more of the following reasons, or come up with your own):

    • Researchers located flaws in the assumptions of industry-funded reports. In practice, a number of countries have mandatory labeling laws in effect, some of which have been in place for nearly 20 years. These countries have not seen rising food prices as a result of the labeling requirement.
    • 80% of the genetically modified crops grown around the world are modified to resist herbicides like Roundup. Since genetically modified crops were allowed to enter commerce in 1996, herbicide use has increased markedly in North Carolina.
    • Weeds have developed resistance to Roundup because of its excessive use. This has forced biotech companies to develop and begin sale of crops resistant to more dangerous herbicides that are more likely to drift to other farms or communities.
    • The vast majority of the American public, in poll after poll, want to see foods with genetically modified ingredients labeled. Every survey for years shows consumer support for labeling to be at or above 90%.
  1. Say, “thank you”.

If you feel nervous about making a phone call, watch CFSA’s “How To Call Your Representative” video.